Home News Calendar Instagram Home News Calendar Instagram Home News Calendar Instagram Home News Calendar Instagram

 

Tag: comics

In Wake of Attack, Comix Legend Says Satire Must Stay Offensive
    Friday, 09 January 2015 /// Written by Trippe

Ron-Turner

Ron Turner of Last Gasp

"[Satire] is important because it brings out the flaws we all have and throws them up on the screen of another person," said Turner. “How they react sort of shows how important that really is.” Later, he added, "Charlie took a hit for everybody." -read on

 

Daniel Clowes - Death Ray
    Tuesday, 30 August 2011 /// Written by Trippe

The fine folks at Drawn and Quarterly mailed us Daniel Clowes' (writer of Ghost World, Art School Confidential , etc.) soon to be released book (Oct.) The Death-Ray.

Want this copy for FREE? The first person to stop in FFDG tomorrow, Wednesday, and asks for the book, gets it. We're open 1-6pm, and you can view Damon Soule's current show Then What Happened.

"It’s like Holden Caulfield with his phaser set on kill. Phonies beware." –Time Magazine

"The Death Ray reads as a cautionary parable and an acidic rumination on the travails of adolescence…Clowes demonstrates what the comic book can do and literary fiction can't."–The Observer UK

Teen outcast Andy is an orphaned nobody with only one friend, the obnoxious-but -loyal Louie. They roam school halls and city streets, invisible to everyone but bullies and tormentors, until the glorious day when Andy takes his first puff on a cigarette. That night he wakes, heart pounding, soaked in sweat, and finds himself suddenly overcome with the peculiar notion that he can do anything. Indeed, he can and as he learns the extent of his new powers, he discovers a terrible and seductive gadget - a hideous compliment to his seething rage - that forever changes everything.

Read more...

 

Big Questions by Anders Nilsen
    Thursday, 14 July 2011 /// Written by Trippe

1pm update: Well, that didn't take long. Right at 1pm when FFDG opened the doors, Clark (below) swooped in and grabbed the book. For the rest who may want the book, go here and order one.

Drawn and Quarterly was kind enough to mail us out this massive (658 paged) magnum opus collection from Chicago based graphic novelist Anders Nilsen. 10 years in the making, Big Questions follows the minimalist story detailing the metaphysical quandaries of the occupants of an endless plain, existing somewhere between a dream and a Russian steppe --- the story's birds and snakes have more to say than their human counterparts and there are hints of the classic hero's journey, but the easy moral that closes most fables is left here as open and ambiguous. Rather than lending its world meaning, Nilsen's parable lets the questions wander out to go where they will.

If you want this beautiful book, stop in FFDG sometime during open hours (Wed-Sat, 1-6pm) and grab it. First come, first... can have the book for free. It's a great collection, and as much as we want it, we'd rather you enjoy it.

The thing is thick.


VIA DRAWN & QUARTERLY: Come out to see the tour that's more than ten years in the making! That's right, folks, the brilliant (and handsome...) Anders Nilsen is going on tour for 600+ page masterwork Big Questions, and he's coming to a town near you!

West Coasters, he's starting with you in July, so make sure not to miss him:

07/20 Family, LA
07/21-24 Comic-Con, San Diego
07/26 Needles and Pens, SF
07/27 Pegasus, Berkeley
07/29 Floating World, Portland
07/30 Fantagraphics, Seattle
07/31 Lucky's, Vancouver


Read more...

 

Monday Mailbag
    Monday, 08 November 2010 /// Written by Trippe

Hey, the mail guy is stuffing envelopes and packages through the mail slot everyday, and every Monday we're going to share... We're callin' it Mailbag Mondays.

Vodka from Blue Angel Vodka, zines from Pigeon Press including: Matt Furie's Boy's Club #4 and Lisa Hanawalt's most excellent I Want You #2. We also received a couple of prints from Oakland based photographer Brad Wenner along with two more zines this time from London's David Shillinglaw and Mike Bauer. ~let's look inside.

Read more...

 

APE Sat & Sun
    Friday, 15 October 2010 /// Written by Van Edwards

APE or The Alternative Press Expo opens up this weekend in San Francisco. Coming back to San Francisco on October 16 and 17 at the Concourse Exhibition Center (located at 635 8th Street), APE offers comics fans an event focused on creativity and devoted to the output of indie cartoonists, artists, and publishers doing the thing they love most. With over 5,000 attendees in 2009, APE remains the premiere alternative comics and publishing show in the nation.

Be on the look out for lots of comic related goodness. Our friends Albert Reyes, Matt Furie, and Aiyana Udesen of Future Colors of America will be there selling zines, orignial art, and other goodies. Albert flew up from LA to hassle passerbys. Matt Furie will be releasing a new Boys Club comic as well.

Speaking of Matt Furie. Here he is holding Vanessa Davis new book, Make Me A Woman. Click for a look inside. Vanesa will be at this year's APE as well.

Read more...

 

Johnny Ryan Interview
    Tuesday, 21 September 2010 /// Written by Mildred

Johnny Ryan's utterly unpretentious taboo-tackling is an infectious and hilarious bombardment of political incorrectness, taking full advantage of the medium's absurdist potential for maximum laughs. In an age when the medium is growing up and aspiring to more mature and hoity-toity literary heights, Ryan builds on the visceral tradition that cartooning has had on our collective funny bone for over a century. Johnny was born in Boston, Massachusetts and grew up in shitty Plymouth, just a mile away from the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Plant. He now lives in Los Angeles with his wife.

"Generally speaking, [Johnny Ryan's] comics are really dumb & infantile, and prove beyond a doubt that chemical pollution, television, video games, pop music, etc. is making us all stupider by the minute..." – R. Crumb

Read more...

 

Shalo P Interview
    Friday, 30 July 2010 /// Written by Alex Braubach

Shalo P is a SF based audio-visual artist who recently exhibited a selection of 14 drawings at Ever Gold Gallery coinciding with the recent release of his self-published “LOVE IS SUCH A DANGEROUS GAME”. The zine, containing work created in a two year period chronicles memories, longing and catastrophic situations in post-modern copy/past collage fashion. They're meticulously wild drawings and really deranged ones at that. The zine comes in two limited versions and are available at the Ever Gold as long as supplies last. It's an absolute gem, so make sure you get yourself a copy. It’s probably the best $8 I’ve ever invested. -Alex Braubach

AMB: I’ve known you since our school days at SFAI and had plenty of opportunities to see your work evolve in the past years. It’s really interesting to see how you have developed from "The Tormentors" paintings you exhibited at Meridian Gallery years ago to what your up to with your video-based performances at New Langton and elsewhere. Your current show at the Ever Gold is an exhibit of drawings. It’s like you’ve come full circle with “Love Is Such A Dangerous Game”. Please describe your current work, the drawings, and how they relate to your previous work.

SP: The work is a barrage of symbols and signs. It’s dense stuff that also seems fit to just be “in the moment”, not only as some mutilation of the bizarre nature of things but also embracing the ways of seeing to varying degrees. You know, as drawings, comics strip and other visual forms. My current works are like celebrations to living at the start of a very weird age.

My conceptual framework hurtles into these different directions and they always seem organic and mine. I’m producing floorshows and farewell concerts with the FRIENDSHIP FRIENDS FOREVER (rainbow band), making videos under the TELEVISION FOR GHOSTS / 2084 FLOORSHOW umbrella, and making images that relay the totemic themes behind all the other work. I shuffle around in formats but the big difference is how close they are to me, personally.

Before I moved to SF I was just a writer, and words just made so much sense to me. Then they seemed phony, manipulative and limited in a world with hypertext in it, a world with so much goddamn subtext to what was lurking under in it’s big storm of changes, in its unconscious birthing of memes. Words were meaningless in the face of the connections between them, in the changing face of how books were produced, in the questions concerning the changes in information retrieval itself. This was big to me - the new ways of experiencing “stuff”, from how we communicated these changes to the part that images play with culture and memory. So I went from writing dialogues to making data maps.

Then I got into imagery again, especially the Medusa, the representation of the incomprehensible. That’s what got me into The Tormentors – relationships - the walls between things breaking down. It was car crashes. Have you ever seen one? It's like that Raymond Carver story "Popular Mechanics", it's a raw moment of chance and horrible corrupted beauty. Things change irrevocably. Well, the drawings... They're my landscape of these feelings - the innate vile beauty of car crashes, the taste of sweat, the medusa's gaze, sexual fantasies, self representation, time and memory - that whole gag. What's the personal side of a good sinner?

AMB: Freddy Krueger.

SP: Hey man, are you going put some cool hyperlinks?

AMB: I can try. I don’t know.

SP: It’ll make it all so much clearer.

AMB: Well, maybe just that last paragraph.

SP: Cool.

Read more...

 

+SF

+NYC

+LA

FULL CALENDARS: BAY AREA | NYC | LA

 

HOME

- NEWS

- CALENDARS

- INSTAGRAM

 

-------------------